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Herb and Brie Omelet

From the humble diner to the upscale restaurant, omelets are now fixtures on American breakfast and brunch menus. With a few deft twists of the wrist, it is easy to transform a few eggs into a light-as-air morning main course. This recipe yields a large, fluffy omelet packed with melting cheese and fresh herbs—ideal for sharing.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 Tbs. heavy cream
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tsp. minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tsp. minced fresh chives
  • 1 tsp. minced fresh chervil or tarragon
  • 1 Tbs. unsalted butter
  • 3 oz. Brie cheese, thinly sliced

Directions:

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, cream, 1/4 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper just until thoroughly blended. Do not overbeat. Add the parsley, chives and chervil and whisk gently to combine.

In a nonstick frying pan, melt the butter over medium heat until it foams and the foam begins to subside. Tilt the pan to cover the bottom evenly with butter.

Add the egg mixture to the pan and cook until the eggs have barely begun to set around the edges, about 30 seconds. Using a heatproof spatula, lift the cooked edges and gently push them toward the center, tilting the pan slightly to allow the liquid egg on top to flow underneath, then cook for 30 seconds. Repeat this process two more times. When the eggs are almost completely set but still slightly moist on top, spread the Brie slices over half of the omelet.

Using the spatula, fold the untopped half of the omelet over the filled half to create a half-moon shape. Let the omelet cook for 30 seconds more, then slide it onto a warmed serving plate. Cut in half and serve at once. Serves 2.

Variation: Sauté 1/2 apple, peeled and diced, in 1 Tbs. unsalted butter until tender-crisp, and add to the omelet along with the Brie. Or, substitute sharp cheddar cheese for the Brie and use 1 green onion, white and green parts, minced, instead of the herbs.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Comfort Food, by Rick Rodgers (Oxmoor House, 2009)