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Pork Chops with Garlic and Herbs

Pork Chops with Garlic and Herbs
This simple and savory marinade transforms plain pork chops into something wonderfully Italian. For a casual dinner party, serve the hot chops with a crisp, cool salad of arugula and chopped tomatoes dressed with balsamic vinegar and olive oil. The marinade is also good on boneless chops or pork tenderloins.

Ingredients:

  • 4 bone-in pork rib chops, each about 8 oz.
     and 1 inch thick
  • 4 garlic cloves, 2 cut into slivers and 2 chopped
  • 2⁄3 cup dry white wine
  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1⁄2 tsp. sugar
  • 1⁄2 tsp. salt, plus more, to taste
  • 1⁄2 tsp. freshly ground pepper, plus more,
      to taste
  • 2 Tbs. chopped fresh sage
  • 2 Tbs. chopped fresh rosemary

Directions:

Working with 1 pork chop at a time, and using a sharp paring knife, cut small slits on both sides of the chop and insert a garlic sliver into each slit. Arrange in a single layer in a nonreactive dish.

In a food processor, combine the wine, olive oil, sugar, the 1/2 tsp. salt and the 1/2 tsp. pepper and process to blend. With the motor running, drop the chopped garlic cloves, the sage and rosemary through the feed tube and process until fairly smooth. Pour the wine mixture over the chops, cover and marinate at room temperature, turning at least once, for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Preheat a broiler according to the manufacturer's instructions, or prepare a medium fire in a grill.

Remove the pork chops from the marinade. Season the chops with salt and pepper and arrange on the broiler pan or on the grill. Broil or grill, turning once, 4 to 5 minutes per side for medium, or until done to your liking.

Transfer the chops to a warmed platter and serve immediately. Serves 4.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma, Essentials of Grilling, by Denis Kelly, Melanie Barnard, Barbara Grunes & Michael McLaughlin (Oxmoor House, 2003).