split-ticker-0802-HP Free Shipping on orders over $49* Use code: SHIP4FREE20% Off Kitchen Towels*
Return to Previous Page

To make a double-crust pie, omit the streusel topping and use a second dough disk. Roll out the second disk as you did the first one. Lay the second pastry round on top of the filling and trim even with the bottom. Fold both overhangs under and flute the edge. Make 3 or 4 steam vents in the center of the top crust and bake as directed.

Ingredients:

  • 1 flaky pastry dough disk (see related recipe at left), at cool room temperature
  • 3 Tbs. cornstarch
  • 1 Tbs. water
  • 1 lb. rhubarb, trimmed and chopped (about 5 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 8 Tbs. (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • Vanilla ice cream or whipped cream for serving (optional)

Directions:

Roll out the dough
Preheat an oven to 400°F.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough disk into a 12-inch round. Fold the dough round in half and transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Unfold the round and ease it into the dish, patting it firmly into the bottom and up the sides. Trim the edges to form a 1-inch overhang. Fold the overhang under itself and crimp to make a decorative edge.

Prepare the filling and streusel
In a small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in the water. In a large bowl, lightly toss the rhubarb with the granulated sugar. Stir in the cornstarch mixture. Spoon the filling into the dough-lined dish.

In another bowl, stir together the flour and brown sugar. Using a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle the streusel over the filling.

Bake the pie
Bake until the juices are bubbling and the crust is golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. Cut the pie into wedges, top each serving with a scoop of ice cream or a dollop of whipped cream and serve immediately. Makes one 9-inch pie.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Food Made Fast Series, Baking, by Lou Seibert Pappas (Oxmoor House, 2006).