Sous Vide

Take the plunge and let warm waters intensify every cookbook recipe youʼve ever aced. There is no other method of cooking that brings out the tenderness and flavor of fresh foods like when using sous vide equipment from Williams-Sonoma. If youʼve had a steak or duck breast cooked sous vide, then you know. If not, you should know just how melt-in-your-mouth exquisite your proteins can be. If you have no idea what sous vide cooking is, imagine a vacuum-sealed tenderloin filet soaking in a simmering container of circulating, moderately hot water. This action is accomplished by a tool like the Polyscience Sous Vide Professional Immersion Circulator thatʼs a sort of wand dipping into the bath to warm and recirculate the water. Itʼs a precision instrument that monitors and adjusts the temperature to keep the bath at your chosen cooking temperature. The wand or water canʼt remove any juices or grain from the beef as the low heat cooks the outer edges gently. The taste and bite of filet mignon cooked sous vide is like eating the purest, most pampered beef.

After you remove your tender filet from the pouch, you can sear the sides on a hot grill or griddle and add any seasoning or spices youʼd like to caramelize on the surface. The result is a gourmet filet done to order on the inside and finished with time-tested high heat on the outside. This is how sous vide is done, although not all foods will be finished on the grill.

You have your choice of immersion units including the Polyscience Professional Creative Series unit that clips onto a stockpot or basin of clean water. It can monitor temps to a 10th of a degree and has a large LCD screen to let you see the progress of your sous vide session. Have a clean, dedicated set of kitchen shears to open your sous vide pouches when the immersion tool is done and then finish your dish as desired. Tamales, fish, eggs and other proteins cook up moist and packed with flavor when thoroughly sealed and given the sous vide treatment.

The Sensaire Sous Vide Machine is another unit that works in a stockpot or bucket. It has a cylindrical shape and a bright blue display and also reads temperatures to 0.1 degrees Fahrenheit. Use it for cooking seafood like salmon and trout or try poaching the perfect egg. You can even use the sous vide machine to pasteurize some foods. Polyscience and Sensaire sous vide machines feature tough pumps that run on the quiet side, and theyʼre easy to maintain, calibrate and operate.

You donʼt have to have a vacuum sealer to cook sous vide, although the two words in French do mean ‟under vacuum.” The nice thing about a vacuum-sealed cooking pouch is the food safety aspect. Youʼll have to introduce your utensils into the bath from time to time. When placing and managing your food pouches you know when you poke your tongs around in the bath youʼre possibly introducing germs that can flourish in the warm water. A properly sealed steak or bunch of baby carrots wonʼt be contaminated by the water bath and the water bath wonʼt be contaminated by the meat or other food. The second great reason to use vacuum sealing is the way food juices intensify when they are forced to interact with each other in a small, sealed space. Sublime is one word for the essences of foods brought out by sous vide culinary technology.

Polyscience offers three different vacuum sealers from the modest 150 Series External Sealer to the 300 Series Unit used by professional chefs. The Caso VC300 Vacuum Sealer has a dry and moist function to protect more delicate food and an adjustable timed seal for marinated foods. Polyscience offers rolled and single-vacuum cooking bags and Caso offers a pair of vacuum bag rolls that you cut to length. If you want to create other foods including sides and legumes we offer other quality slow cookers including rice cookers and slow cookers.