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Turkey Salad with Dried Cherries

Turkey Salad with Dried Cherries
Dried fruits are an excellent pantry item, especially in winter when fresh fruits are not as varied as they are in other seasons. Dried cherries, cranberries, peaches, plums, apricots, pears, and even dried mangoes and pineapple can add a flavorful boost to green salads, pasta salads and grain-based salads. Chop or julienne larger fruits and halve smaller ones, such as cranberries and cherries, before adding them.

Ingredients:

  • 1 small celery root, about 3/4 lb.
  • 4 celery stalks, minced
  • 2 cups diced cooked turkey or chicken, chilled (see Note)
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup dried pitted cherries, halved, or other dried fruits
  • 2 Tbs. light sour cream
  • 2 Tbs. mayonnaise
  • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 1/2 Tbs. Champagne vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 8 to 10 lettuce leaves

Directions:

Using a paring knife, peel the thick skin from the celery root. Then, using the large holes on a handheld grater-shredder, shred the celery root into a bowl.

Add the celery, turkey, pine nuts, dried cherries, sour cream, mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar, salt and pepper to the celery root and mix well. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to overnight before serving.

Line a platter with the lettuce leaves. Mound the turkey mixture atop the lettuce. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

Note: For the cooked poultry in this recipe, use leftover roast turkey or chicken. If you have none on hand, poach some chicken breasts: Put 2 or 3 bone-in chicken breast halves in a large saucepan and add lightly salted water to cover. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand for 30 minutes. Discard the skin and bones and cut the meat into bite-size pieces.

Adapted from The Williams-Sonoma Cookbook, Edited by Chuck Williams (Free Press, 2008).