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Pork Involtini with Spinach

A favorite in Italy, involtini are stuffed rolls, typically made by wrapping thin slices of meat around a savory filling. Here, a pork tenderloin is butterflied and pounded to an even thickness, then stuffed with prosciutto, fontina cheese and fresh sage leaves before cooking. Garlicky spinach makes the perfect accompaniment.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork tenderloin, about 1 lb., butterflied and pounded 1/4 inch thick  
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 
  • 6 slices prosciutto  
  • 1/2 cup coarsely shredded fontina cheese 
  • 8 fresh sage leaves  
  • 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil  
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 
  • 1 lb. baby spinach leaves  
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges (optional) 

Directions:

Preheat an oven to 400°F.

Lay the pork loin flat and season well with salt and pepper. Arrange the prosciutto slices on top of the pork, then scatter with the cheese and sage. Starting at a long side, roll the loin up tightly and secure with toothpicks at 1-inch intervals.

In an ovenproof sauté pan over medium-high heat, warm 1 Tbs. of the olive oil. Add the pork and sear, turning occasionally, until well browned, 6 to 8 minutes total. Scatter half of the garlic over the pork, transfer to the oven and roast until the juices run clear when the pork is pierced with the tip of a sharp knife, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the pork to a cutting board, cover loosely with aluminum foil and let rest for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan over medium heat, warm the remaining 1 Tbs. olive oil. Add the remaining garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook for 2 minutes.

Slice the pork and serve over the spinach with lemon wedges alongside. Serves 4.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Cooking for Friends, by Alison Attenborough and Jamie Kimm (Oxmoor House, 2008).