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Baked Ham with Green Beans

A baked ham is perfect for leftovers. Bake the ham tonight and you’ll have extra to make other delicious dishes later in the week (see related recipes at left).

Storage tip: Leftover ham can be cooled, wrapped in plastic wrap and stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Freezing compromises the flavor and texture of the ham, so plan to use refrigerated leftovers the same week you bake the ham.

Ingredients:

  • 1 smoked ham on the bone, about 7 1/2 lb., fat trimmed and scored
  • 1 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 lb. green beans, trimmed
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions:

Bake the ham
Preheat an oven to 325°F.

Place the ham in a large roasting pan and pour the orange juice into the pan bottom. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour. Remove the foil and continue to bake until the ham is completely heated through, about 1 hour more; an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the ham, away from the bone, should register 160°F. Baste the ham occasionally during the last hour of cooking. Transfer the ham to a carving board, cover loosely with aluminum foil and let rest for 20 minutes.

Prepare the green beans
While the ham is resting, pour off all but 2 Tbs. of the fat from the roasting pan. Add the green beans and shallots to the pan, season with salt and pepper, and stir to combine. Return the pan to the oven and roast, stirring occasionally, until the green beans are crisp-tender, about 15 minutes.

Carve the ham
Slice the ham and arrange on individual plates with the green beans. Let the remaining ham cool, then store for later use (see note above). Serves 6 to 8; makes about 8 cups (5 lb.) sliced or cubed ham total.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Food Made Fast Series, Make Ahead, by Rick Rodgers (Oxmoor House, 2008).